Volume 6 Issue 3 (May - June), 2020

Original Articles

Assessment of alterations in salivary Nickel and Chromium levels in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment- A clinical study
Tushar Abrol, Kamal J. Manhas, Isha aggarwal, Indu Dhiman, Shikha Thakur, Isha Aggarwal

Background: Austenitic stainless steel is usually used to make orthodontic bands, brackets, and wires. They contain around 812% nickel and 1722% chromium. Stainless steel derives its features of ductility and corrosion resistance through these elements. Hence; the present study was undertaken for assessing the alterations in salivary nickel and chromium levels in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Material and methods: This in-vivo study was conducted to detect salivary levels of Ni and Cr in 80 patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Slot buccal tubes were banded to molars, which was welded onto band material. The wires used in a sequential manner were nickel-titanium wires (0.014″, 0.016″), heat activated nickel-titanium wires (0.017″ 0.025″, 0.019″ 0.025″) and stainless steel wires (0.017″ 0.025″, 0.019″ 0.025″). The sample of saliva was collected 10 minutes after asking the patients to clean the mouth with distilled water. Approximately 5 ml of saliva was collected. The sample was refrigerated and sent to the laboratory for processing. Results: Mean nickel content in the first group was 2.014, with a standard deviation of 0.546. The mean and standard deviation in the other three groups was elaborated in table 3. Similarly, the mean Chromium content in the first group was 12.913 with a standard deviation of 2.594. The mean Chromium content in the second group was 67.514 with a standard deviation of 7.082. The mean and standard deviation in the other groups was elaborated in table 4. Statistically significant differences in the amount of Ni and Cr released into saliva were observed between the experimental and control groups with p values of .046 and .027 respectively. Conclusion: Fixed orthodontic appliances tend to significantly alter the salivary levels of Nickel and Chromium. Key words: Saliva, Chromium, nickel, orthodontic appliances

 
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